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Built in 1904, The Woodbine Hotel was originally The Shapira Hotel. Jake and Sarah Shapira, Jewish Russian immigrants, came to Madisonville in the 1870's. Jake owned a dry goods store on the Town Square and ran a saloon in a building located behind the store. Relocated to the Woodbine property in 1920, the saloon (now known as the Brimberry House) is the oldest building in the county, circa 1870. Their boarding house, located on the same site as the current hotel, burnt to the ground in 1903. The town had just completed a new courthouse, one of the tallest and most imposing in Texas. The railroad had been surveyed and was being built with the depot behind the Shapira property, and a new bank building was being constructed two doors from the hotel site on N. Madison Street. In addition, the county's cotton productions, untouched by the boll weevil at the time, continued to grow. The Shapira's decided to rebuild. The hotel is a landmark for the area and remains the largest home in the county. It is constructed of two "kit houses" purchased in either in St. Louis or Kansas City probably from Sears & Roebuck. The Eastlake house and the Queen Ann Victorian house face each other joined by an upstairs and downstairs parlor. The hotel originally had 16 rooms and offered accommodations for eight guests. Only the owners' suite had indoor plumbing. Guests used the outhouses and bathhouses located in the back with tub water heated in the kitchen. Eventually, plumbing was added to a few rooms, but many were small rooms. The telephone also came to Madisonville in 1904 and the town's original telephone booth was, and still is, located at the hotel. At the time, it was the only telephone available to the townsfolk. During the construction of the hotel and on the eve of his daughter's wedding, Jake stepped on a nail and died three weeks later of tetanus. Sarah and her son David finished the construction and operated the hotel until 1922 when they moved to Crockett where her son Maya purchased a hotel on the square. Leased to various operators for a number of years, Clara Wills purchased the hotel in 1929 and changed the name to the Wills Hotel. Clara and her daughter Tommie continued the tradition of serving fine family style meals including fried chicken and chicken fried steak. The hotel underwent a major renovation in the mid-1930's that altered the porches and covered the original wooden walls with protective siding. The Depression, a World War, the abandonment of the rail line to Madisonville and the new focus on interstate travel and motels all led to the demise of the property. They closed to guests in 1974 and moved out in 1978. Randy and Lynne Parten purchased the hotel in 1979 and completely restored the building to its original condition and function, saving it from demolition. The hotel was a jewel in the rough, which showed after two years of major reconstruction. It now proudly boasts such features as 12,000 hand crafted "fish scale" cedar siding, a standing seam metal roof, restored native virgin yellow pine woodwork and original decorative plinth blocks with bluebonnets above each doorways and windows. Beautiful porches wrap around upstairs and down along the front and back of the building and historically correct wallpaper is in each room. The building was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and became a Texas Historic Landmark in 1982. Randy and Lynne Parten donated the hotel to The Woodbine Foundation in 1997. The Foundation operated the hotel as a nonprofit organization dedicated to charitable, educational and religious organizations. Susan and Reinhard Warmuth purchased The Woodbine Hotel in October 1999 with plans to return The Woodbine back to its glory days when it was the town's social center and had the finest restaurant in the area. They hope that travelers will again remark, like Norman Kittrel did in 1921: "There is not a hotel in Texas today, barring none, that ever served such meals as were served in that interior hamlet (Madisonville)." Susan runs the hotel on her own since 2003 and does the cooking at night.  She also does all the baking and pastries with wedding cakes as her specialty.  Come enjoy the fine cooking for lunch Tuesday through Friday from 11 am to 2 pm, dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 6 to 9 pm and Sunday Brunch from 11 am to 2 pm.  Great food from hand cut steaks and fresh fish to the best fried chicken and fresh made mashed potatoes in the area!
WOODBINE HOTEL & RESTAURANT 209 N. Madison, Madisonville, Texas  77864 (936)-348-3333 Fax: (936)-348-6268 www.woodbinehotel.com woodbine@woodbinehotel.com
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      A Registered Texas Historical Landmark
936.348.3333
The Woodbine Hotel and Restaurant Built in 1904, The Woodbine Hotel was originally The Shapira Hotel. Jake and Sarah Shapira, Jewish Russian immigrants, came to Madisonville in the 1870's. Jake owned a dry goods store on the Town Square and ran a saloon in a building located behind the store. Relocated to the Woodbine property in 1920, the saloon (now known as the Brimberry House) is the oldest building in the county, circa 1870. Their boarding house, located on the same site as the current hotel, burnt to the ground in 1903. The town had just completed a new courthouse, one of the tallest and most imposing in Texas. The railroad had been surveyed and was being built with the depot behind the Shapira property, and a new bank building was being constructed two doors from the hotel site on N. Madison Street. In addition, the county's cotton productions, untouched by the boll weevil at the time, continued to grow. The Shapira's decided to rebuild. The hotel is a landmark for the area and remains the largest home in the county. It is constructed of two "kit houses" purchased in either in St. Louis or Kansas City probably from Sears & Roebuck. The Eastlake house and the Queen Ann Victorian house face each other joined by an upstairs and downstairs parlor. The hotel originally had 16 rooms and offered accommodations for eight guests. Only the owners' suite had indoor plumbing. Guests used the outhouses and bathhouses located in the back with tub water heated in the kitchen. Eventually, plumbing was added to a few rooms, but many were small rooms. The telephone also came to Madisonville in 1904 and the town's original telephone booth was, and still is, located at the hotel. At the time, it was the only telephone available to the townsfolk. During the construction of the hotel and on the eve of his daughter's wedding, Jake stepped on a nail and died three weeks later of tetanus. Sarah and her son David finished the construction and operated the hotel until 1922 when they moved to Crockett where her son Maya purchased a hotel on the square. Leased to various operators for a number of years, Clara Wills purchased the hotel in 1929 and changed the name to the Wills Hotel. Clara and her daughter Tommie continued the tradition of serving fine family style meals including fried chicken and chicken fried steak. The hotel underwent a major renovation in the mid- 1930's that altered the porches and covered the original wooden walls with protective siding. The Depression, a World War, the abandonment of the rail line to Madisonville and the new focus on interstate travel and motels all led to the demise of the property. They closed to guests in 1974 and moved out in 1978. Randy and Lynne Parten purchased the hotel in 1979 and completely restored the building to its original condition and function, saving it from demolition. The hotel was a jewel in the rough, which showed after two years of major reconstruction. It now proudly boasts such features as 12,000 hand crafted "fish scale" cedar siding, a standing seam metal roof, restored native virgin yellow pine woodwork and original decorative plinth blocks with bluebonnets above each doorways and windows. Beautiful porches wrap around upstairs and down along the front and back of the building and historically correct wallpaper is in each room. The building was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 and became a Texas Historic Landmark in 1982. Randy and Lynne Parten donated the hotel to The Woodbine Foundation in 1997. The Foundation operated the hotel as a nonprofit organization dedicated to charitable, educational and religious organizations. Susan and Reinhard Warmuth purchased The Woodbine Hotel in October 1999 with plans to return The Woodbine back to its glory days when it was the town's social center and had the finest restaurant in the area. They hope that travelers will again remark, like Norman Kittrel did in 1921: "There is not a hotel in Texas today, barring none, that ever served such meals as were served in that interior hamlet (Madisonville)." Susan runs the hotel on her own since 2003 and does the cooking at night.  She also does all the baking and pastries with wedding cakes as her specialty.  Come enjoy the fine cooking for lunch Tuesday through Friday from 11 am to 2 pm, dinner Tuesday through Saturday from 6 to 9 pm and Sunday Brunch from 11 am to 2 pm.  Great food from hand cut steaks and fresh fish to the best fried chicken and fresh made mashed potatoes in the area!
      A Registered Texas Historical Landmark